dois for books


CROSSREF BOOK DOIs

CrossRef encourages members to assign Digital Object Identifiers (DOIs) to books for reference linking. Since CrossRef began
accepting book deposits in 2006, the number of books in the system has grown dramatically.

book doi chart


Using DOIs for Books in the Mobile Environment: A Report Prepared for CrossRef, Bill Kasdorf, Apex Content Solutions.

ASSIGNING CROSSREF DOIs BOOKS—WHAT’S THE BENEFIT?

Discoverability, increased usage, traffic—the same benefits publishers get from assigning CrossRef DOIs to journals, conference
proceedings, and other content accrue to book publishers. See examples.

CROSSREF DOI REFERENCE LINKING FROM BOOKS—WHO DOES IT HELP?

Researchers get a better experience, persistent links, and support for good scholarship—again, exactly the same benefits that
journal publishers enjoy. Citation styles and conventions for books certainly vary from field to field. Some disciplines may
principally reference book titles, others may cite journal articles and book chapters. Regardless of the kind of references, users
benefit from being able to easily locate cited items.

CrossRef reference linking from book content is optional for CrossRef members. But, publishers who do provide reference links
from their online books are increasing the connections between their content and others, and contribute to improved navigation
and discovery through citations in books.

HOW IT’S DONE: CROSSREF DOIs ASSIGNED TO BOOKS

Examples from other publishers assigning CrossRef DOIs to books may help you get started:

Reference Work
The Oxford Dictionary of National Biography has assigned DOIs to each of the more than 65,000 entries.

Book Title A Comparison of the Dynamical Evolution of Planetary Systems from Springer his title a level
http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/1-4020-4466-6. Follow the link to see CrossRef DOIs in the table of contents for each chapter as well.

Book Chapter The American Psychological Association’s book, Genetic testing for cancer: Psychological approaches for helping
patients and families has assigned CrossRef DOIs to chapters. See “A Family Matter,” http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/10828-007.

HOW IT’S DONE: CROSSREF DOI REFERENCE LINKING OUT OF BOOKS

Here is an example from Oxford University Press, which uses CrossRef DOIs to link its book references:
http://www.oxfordscholarship.com/oso/public/content/economicsfinance/0199288917/toc.html





This OUP book uses CrossRef DOIs assigned at the title and chapter levels, but it also uses CrossRef DOIs to link to books from
its bibliography. This bibliography contains 69 CrossRef DOI links out of a total of 231 references. Two of these links are to books.





The reference to Dudwick et. al. on this page uses a CrossRef DOI to link the user to a book published by the World Bank (below).





BEST PRACTICES FOR CROSSREF BOOK DOIs

See our Best Practices guidelines at http://www.crossref.org/06members/best_practices_for_books.html. For information on
required and optional metadata, version considerations, and maximizing matching for depositors and linkers.

The metadata required for book CrossRef DOI registration is described in sections 6-8 of
http://www.crossref.org/schema/deposit/crossref4.3.0.xsd.

The Web Deposit Form (http://www.crossref.org/webDeposit/) will also register CrossRef DOIs for book titles, chapters, and
reference entries.

For more information, please see CrossRef Best Practices for Books.


ARE THERE OTHER DOIs FOR BOOKS BEYOND CROSSREF?

Yes, please see the document http://www.crossref.org/06members/otherdoifaq.html for more information on other DOIs that
book publishers can use for applications other than citation reference linking.

Book Industry Study Group Roadmap of Identifiers.

For a print-friendly summary please see our DOIs for Books handout (PDF).

Updated April 17, 2014

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