Crossref Event Data: early preview now available

Crossref Event Data logo

Test out the early preview of Event Data while we continue to develop it. Share your thoughts. And be warned: we may break a few eggs from time to time!

Egg
Chicken by anbileru adaleru from the The Noun Project

Want to discover which research works are being shared, liked and commented on? What about the number of times a scholarly item is referenced? Starting today, you can whet your appetite with an early preview of the forthcoming Crossref Event Data service. We invite you to start exploring the activity of DOIs as they permeate and interact with the world after publication.

Continue reading “Crossref Event Data: early preview now available”

What is there 80 million of?

As of this week, there are 80,000,000 scholarly items registered with Crossref!

By the way, we update these interesting Crossref stats regularly and you can search the metadata.

The 80 millionth scholarly item is [drumroll…] Management Approaches in Beihagi History from the journal Oman Chapter of Arabian Journal of Business and Management Review, published by Al Manhal in the United Arab Emirates. Continue reading “What is there 80 million of?”

Dr Norman Paskin

Dr Norman Paskin
Dr Norman Paskin

It was with great sadness and shock that I learned that Dr Norman Paskin had passed away unexpectedly on the 27th March. This is a big loss to the DOI, Crossref and digital information communities. Norman was the driving force behind the DOI System and was a key supporter and ally of Crossref from the start. Norman founded the International DOI Foundation in 1998 and ran it successfully until the end of 2015 when he moved to a strategic role as an Independent Board Member. Continue reading “Dr Norman Paskin”

The Wikipedia Library: A Partnership of Wikipedia and Publishers to Enhance Research and Discovery

Back in 2014, Geoffrey Bilder blogged about the kick-off of an initiative between Crossref and Wikimedia to better integrate scholarly literature into the world’s largest knowledge space, Wikipedia. Since then, Crossref has been working to coordinate activities with Wikimedia: Joe Wass has worked with them to create a live stream of content being cited in Wikipedia; and we’re including Wikipedia in Event Data, a new service to launch later this year. In that time, we’ve also seen Wikipedia importance grow in terms of the volume of DOI referrals.

Alex Stinson, Project Manager for the Wikipedia Library, and our guest blogger! This file is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported license (Source: Myleen Hollero Photography)
Alex Stinson, Project Manager for the Wikipedia Library, and our guest blogger! This file is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported license (Source: Myleen Hollero Photography)

Alex Stinson, Project Manager for the Wikipedia Library, and guest blogger! This file is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported license (Source: Myleen Hollero Photography)

How can we keep this momentum going and continue to improve the way we link Wikipedia articles with the formal literature? We invited Alex Stinson, a project manager at The Wikipedia Library (and one of our first guest bloggers) to explain more: Continue reading “The Wikipedia Library: A Partnership of Wikipedia and Publishers to Enhance Research and Discovery”

Community responses to our proposal for early content registration

TL;DR:

We will proceed with implementing the proposed support for registering content before online availability. Adopting the workflow will be optional and will involve no extra fees.

Background

At the end of January, Crossref issued a “request for community comment” on a proposed new process to support the registration of content including DOIs before online availability. We promised that we would summarize the results of the survey once we had received and analyzed all the responses.

Support for Crossref implementing the proposed new workflow was overwhelming. Of the 104 responses, 90 were positive, 7 were neutral and 7 were negative. As such we will proceed to make the necessary changes to better support registering content before online availability. We aim to enable this functionality in the second half of 2016.

We received survey responses varying in length from one or two sentences to multiple pages. A lot of the responses also interspersed questions and observations about entirely different issues that were of interest to respondents. As such, it has taken a while for us to analyze the results. We also found it was pretty much impossible for us to tabulate a summary of the responses to the direct questions. Instead we’ll summarize the responses at a high level and then drill down into some of the nuances in the answers and issues that were raised from the responses.

Continue reading “Community responses to our proposal for early content registration”

Request for Community Comment: registering content before online availability

Crossref is proposing a process to support the registration of content—including DOIs and other metadata—prior to that content being made available, or published, online. We’ve drafted a paper providing background on the reasons we want to support this and highlighting the use cases. One of the main needs is in journal publishing to support registration of Accepted Manuscripts immediately on or shortly after acceptance, and dealing with press embargoes.

Proposal doc for community comment
Proposal doc for community comment

We request community comment on the proposed approach as outlined in this report. Continue reading “Request for Community Comment: registering content before online availability”