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DOIs unambiguously and persistently identify published, trustworthy, citable online scholarly literature. Right?

The South Park movie , “Bigger, Longer & Uncut” has a DOI: a) http://dx.doi.org/10.5240/B1FA-0EEC-C316-3316-3A73-L So does the pornographic movie, “Young Sex Crazed Nurses”: b) http://dx.doi.org/10.5240/4CF3-57AB-2481-651D-D53D-Q And the following DOI points to a fake article on a “Google-Based Alien Detector”: c) http://dx.doi.org/10.6084/m9.figshare.93964 And the following DOI refers to an infamous fake article on literary theory: d) http://dx.doi.org/10.2307/466856 This scholarly article discusses the entirely fictitious Australian “Drop Bear”: e) http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/00049182.2012.731307

Easily add publications to your ORCID profile

You can now easily search for publications and add them to your ORCID profile in the new beta of Crossref Metadata Search (CRMDS). The user interface is pretty self-explanatory, but if you want to read about it before trying it, here is a summary of how it works. When you go to to CRMDS, you will see that there is now a small ORCID sign-in button on the top right-hand side of the screen.

Crossref Metadata Search++

We have just released a bunch of new functionality for Crossref Metadata Search. The tool now supports the following features: A completely new UI Faceted searches Copying of search results as formatted citations using CSL COinS, so that you can easily import results into Zotero and other document management tools An API, so that you can integrate Crossref Metadata Search into your own applications, plugins, etc.

PatentCite

If you’ve ever thought that scholarly citation practice was antediluvian and perverse- you should check-out patents some day. Over the past year of so Crossref has been working with Cambia and the The Lens to explore how we can better link scholarly literature to and from the patent literature. The first object of our collaboration was to attempt to link patents hosted on the new, beta version of The Lens to the Scholarly literature.

Crossref and DataCite unify support for HTTP content negotiation

admin

admin – 2012 May 17

In Blog

Last year Crossref and DataCite announced support for HTTP content negotiation for DOI names. Today, we are pleased to report further collaboration on the topic. We think it is very important that the two largest DOI Registration Agencies work together in order to provide metadata services to DOI names. The current implementation is documented in detail at http://citation.crosscite.org/ The documentation explains HTTP content negotiation as implemented by both Registration Agencies and provides a list of supported content types.

PDF-Extract

PDF-EXTRACT

Crossref Labs is happy to announce the first public release of “pdf-extract” an open source set of tools and libraries for extracting citation references (and, eventually, other semantic metadata) from PDFs. We first demonstrated this tool to Crossref members at our annual meeting last year. See the pdf-extract labs page for a detailed introduction to this new set of tools.

If you are unable to download and install the tool, you can play with a experimental web interface called “Extracto.” Be warned, Extracto is running on very feeble server using an erratic and slow internet connection. The only guarantee that we can make about using it is that it will repeatedly fall over and annoy you. The weasel has spoken.

DOIs for PHD Comics’ Valentine’s Day Reading List

Geoffrey Bilder

Geoffrey Bilder – 2012 February 14

In ComicsDOIs

PHD Comics has posted its Valentine’s Day Reading list. Without DOIs!    So in order to preserve the scholarly citation record, we’ve resolved those that have DOIs…. Title:  The St. Valentine’s Day Frontal Passage Citation:  Sassen, K, 1980, ‘The St. Valentine’s Day Frontal Passage’, Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society, vol. 61, no. 2, p. 122. Crossref DOI:  http://dx.doi.org/10.1175/1520-0477(1980)0612.0.CO;2 Title:  SUICIDE AND HOMICIDE ON ST. VALENTINE’S DAY Citation:  LESTER, D, 1990, ‘SUICIDE AND HOMICIDE ON ST.

Turning DOIs into formatted citations

Today two new content types were added to dx.doi.org resolution for Crossref DOIs. These allow anyone to retrieve DOI bibliographic metadata as formatted bibliographic entries. To perform the formatting we’re using the citation style language processor, citeproc-js which supports a shed load of citation styles and locales. In fact, all the styles and locales found in the CSL repositories, including many common styles such as bibtex, apa, ieee, harvard, vancouver and chicago are supported.

Determining the Crossref membership status of a domain

kward

kward – 2011 November 22

In Reverse Look-UpDomainsMember Data

We’ve been asked a few times if it is possible to determine whether or not a particular domain name belongs to a Crossref member. To address this we’re launching another small service that performs something like a “reverse look-up” of URLs and domain names to DOIs and Crossref member status. The service provides an API that will attempt to reverse look-up a URL to a DOI and return the membership status (member or non-member) of the root domain of the URL.

DataCite supporting content negotiation

In April In April for its DOIs. At the time I cheekily called-out DataCite to start supporting content negotiation as well. Edward Zukowski (DataCite’s resident propellor-head) took up the challenge with gusto and, as of September 22nd DataCite has also been supporting content negotiation for its DOIs. This means that one million more DOIs are now linked-data friendly. Congratulations to Ed and the rest of the team at DataCite. We hope this is a trend.
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