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URLs and DOIs: a complicated relationship

As the linking hub for scholarly content, it’s our job to tame URLs and put in their place something better. Why? Most URLs suffer from link rot and can be created, deleted or changed at any time. And that’s a problem if you’re trying to cite them.

Preprints are go at Crossref!

Rachael Lammey

Rachael Lammey – 2016 November 02

In PersistencePreprints

We’re excited to say that we’ve finished the work on our infrastructure to allow members to register preprints. Want to know why we’re doing this? Jennifer Lin explains the rationale in detail in an earlier post, but in short we want to help make sure that:

  • links to these publications persist over time
  • they are connected to the full history of the shared research results
  • the citation record is clear and up-to-date

Doing so will help fully integrate preprint publications into the formal scholarly record.

The Organization Identifier Project: a way forward

The scholarly communications sector has built and adopted a series of open identifier and metadata infrastructure systems to great success. Content identifiers (through Crossref and DataCite) and contributor identifiers (through ORCID) have become foundational infrastructure to the industry. But there still seems to be one piece of the infrastructure that is missing. There is as yet no open, stakeholder-governed infrastructure for organization identifiers and associated metadata. In order to understand this gap, Crossref, DataCite and ORCID have been collaborating to:

Smart alone; brilliant together. Community reigns at Crossref LIVE16

Ginny Hendricks

Ginny Hendricks – 2016 October 29

In Uncategorized

A bit different from our traditional meetings, Crossref LIVE16 next week is the first of a totally new annual event for the scholarly communications community. Our theme is Smart alone; brilliant together. We have a broad program of both informal and plenary talks across two days. There will be stations to visit, conversation starters, and entertainment, that highlight what our community can achieve if it works together. Check out the final program.

Important changes to Similarity Check

New features, new indexing, new name - oh my!

Crossref Similarity Check logo

TL;DR The indexing of Similarity Check users’ content into the shared full-text database is about to get a lot faster. Now we need members assistance in helping Turnitin (the company who own and operate the iThenticate plagiarism checking tool) to transition to a new method of indexing content.

For existing Similarity Check users: please check that your metadata includes full-text URLs so that Turnitin can quickly and easily locate and index your content. Full-text URLs need to be included in 90% of journal article metadata by 31st December 2016.

Take this 4 minute survey if you’re a Crossref member who registers book content

April Ondis

April Ondis – 2016 October 12

In BooksReferences

This one is for the book publishers. If you are a Crossref member and register online or digital books with us, we would like to know how you handle reference lists. Do you include DOIs that link out to other books and articles in your reference lists? Please take our 4-minute survey: http://www.surveygizmo.com/s3/3008801/f46898b8751c To thank you for taking the time to respond, we’ll enter you in a drawing to receive this book lovers’ “Bookworm” candle with apple fragrance, a delightful autumn accompaniment to your favorite digital edition.

One member, one vote: Crossref Board Election opens today, September 30th

Watch for two important emails on September 30th – one with a voting link and material, and one with your username and password. RunningCrossref well is a key part of our mission. It’s important that we be as neutral and fair as possible, and we are always striving for that balance. One of our stated principles is “One member, one vote”. And each year we encourage each of our members-standing at over 6000 today-to participate in the election of new board members.

New Crossref DOI display guidelines are on the way

TL;DR Crossref will be updating its DOI Display Guidelines within the next couple of weeks. This is a big deal. We last made a change in 2011 so it’s not something that happens often or that we take lightly. In short, the changes are to drop “dx” from DOI links and to use “https:” rather than “http:”. An example of the new best practice in displaying a Crossref DOI link is: https://doi.

The membership boom & why metadata isn’t like beer

Susan Collins

Susan Collins – 2016 September 23

In Member Briefing

You might recognize my name if you’ve ever applied for Crossref membership on behalf of your organization. It recently occurred to me that, since I’ve been working in our membership department for eight years, I’ve been a part of shepherding new members for half of our history. And my, how we’ve grown. Membership growth by country Though it may be easy to see our membership growth by looking at the numbers, I think it’s interesting to consider where we’ve grown.

Crossmark 2.0 - grab the code and you’re ready to go!

Kirsty Meddings

Kirsty Meddings – 2016 September 15

In Crossmark

On September 1st we completed the final stage of the Crossmark v2.0 release and sent an email to all participating publishers containing instructions for upgrading. The first phase of v2.0 happened when we changed the design and layout of the Crossmark box back in May of this year. That allowed us to better display the growing set of additional metadata that our members are depositing, and saw the introduction of the Linked Clinical Trials feature.

crossmark_stack

Now all publishers have the opportunity to complete the upgrade by simply replacing the Crossmark button and the piece of code that calls the box. The new button designs are, we think, a much better fit for most websites, and are designed to look more like a button than a flat logo. The new buttons are also available
as .eps
files for placement in PDFs.

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