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Members will soon be able to assign Crossref DOIs to preprints

Geoffrey Bilder

Geoffrey Bilder – 2016 May 05

In Preprints

****TL;DR

By August 2016, Crossref will enable its members to assign Crossref DOIs to preprints. Preprint DOIs will be assigned by the Crossref member responsible for the preprint and that DOI will be different from the DOI assigned by the publisher to the accepted manuscript and version of record. Crossref’s display guidelines, tools and APIs will be modified in order to enable researchers to easily identify and link to the best available version of a document (BAV). We are doing this in order to support the changing publishing models of our members and in order to clarify the scholarly citation record.

Background

Why is this news? Well, to understand that you need to know a little Crossref history.

(cue music and fade to sepia) 

Crossref Brand update: new names, logos, guidelines, + video

Ginny Hendricks

Ginny Hendricks – 2016 April 29

In Uncategorized

It can be a pain when companies rebrand as it usually requires some coordinated updating of wording and logos on websites, handouts, and slides. Nevermind changing habits and remembering to use the new names verbally in presentations.

Why bother?

As our infrastructure and services expanded, we sometimes branded services with no reference to Crossref. As explained in our The Logo Has Landed post last November, this has led to confusion, and it was not scalable nor sustainable. 

With a cohesive approach to naming and branding, the benefits of changing to (some) new names and logos should help everyone. Our aim is to stem confusion and be in a much better position to provide clear messages and useful resources so that people don’t have to try hard to understand what Crossref enables them to do. 

So while it may be a bit of a pain short-term, it will be worth it!

What are the new names?

Getting Started with Crossref DOIs, courtesy of Scholastica

_I had a great chat with Danielle Padula of Scholastica, a journals _platform with an integrated peer-review process that was founded in 2011. We talked about how journals get started with Crossref, and she turned our conversation into a blog post that describes the steps to begin registering content and depositing metadata with us. Since the result is a really useful description of our new member on-boarding process, I want to share it with you here as well.

Crossref Event Data: early preview now available

Crossref Event Data logo

Test out the early preview of Event Data while we continue to develop it. Share your thoughts. And be warned: we may break a few eggs from time to time!

Egg

Chicken by anbileru adaleru from the The Noun Project

Want to discover which research works are being shared, liked and commented on? What about the number of times a scholarly item is referenced? Starting today, you can whet your appetite with an early preview of the forthcoming Crossref Event Data service. We invite you to start exploring the activity of DOIs as they permeate and interact with the world after publication.

What are there 80 million of?

Ginny Hendricks

Ginny Hendricks – 2016 April 08

In Member BriefingNews

As of this week, there are 80,000,000 scholarly items registered with Crossref!

By the way, we update these interesting Crossref stats regularly and you can search the metadata.

The 80 millionth scholarly item is [drumroll…] Management Approaches in Beihagi History from the journal Oman Chapter of Arabian Journal of Business and Management Review, published by Al Manhal in the United Arab Emirates.

Dr Norman Paskin

Ed Pentz

Ed Pentz – 2016 April 06

In Uncategorized

Dr Norman Paskin
Dr Norman Paskin

It was with great sadness and shock that I learned that Dr Norman Paskin had passed away unexpectedly on the 27th March. This is a big loss to the DOI, Crossref and digital information communities. Norman was the driving force behind the DOI System and was a key supporter and ally of Crossref from the start. Norman founded the International DOI Foundation in 1998 and ran it successfully until the end of 2015 when he moved to a strategic role as an Independent Board Member.

The Wikipedia Library: A Partnership of Wikipedia and Publishers to Enhance Research and Discovery

Back in 2014, Geoffrey Bilder blogged about the kick-off of an initiative between Crossref and Wikimedia to better integrate scholarly literature into the world’s largest knowledge space, Wikipedia. Since then, Crossref has been working to coordinate activities with Wikimedia: Joe Wass has worked with them to create a live stream of content being cited in Wikipedia; and we’re including Wikipedia in Event Data, a new service to launch later this year. In that time, we’ve also seen Wikipedia importance grow in terms of the volume of DOI referrals.

Alex Stinson, Project Manager for the Wikipedia Library, and our guest blogger! This file is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported license (Source: Myleen Hollero Photography)

Alex Stinson, Project Manager for the Wikipedia Library, and our guest blogger! This file is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported license (Source: Myleen Hollero Photography)

Alex Stinson, Project Manager for the Wikipedia Library, and guest blogger! This file is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported license (Source: Myleen Hollero Photography)

How can we keep this momentum going and continue to improve the way we link Wikipedia articles with the formal literature? We invited Alex Stinson, a project manager at The Wikipedia Library (and one of our first guest bloggers) to explain more:

Python and Ruby Libraries for accessing the Crossref API

I’m a co-founder with rOpenSci, a non-profit that focuses on making software to facilitate reproducible and open science. Back in 2013 we started to make an R client working with various Crossref web services. I was lucky enough to attend last year’s Crossref annual meeting in Boston, and gave one talk on details of the programmatic clients, and another higher level talk on text mining and use of metadata for research.

Crossref has a newish API encompassing works, journals, members, funders and more (check out the API docs), as well as a few other services. Essential to making the Crossref APIs easily accessible—and facilitating easy tool/app creation and exploration—are programmatic clients for popular languages. I’ve maintained an R client for a while now, and have been working on Python and Ruby clients for the past four months or so.

Community responses to our proposal for early content registration

TL;DR:

We will proceed with implementing the proposed support for registering content before online availability. Adopting the workflow will be optional and will involve no extra fees.

Background

At the end of January, Crossref issued a “request for community comment” on a proposed new process to support the registration of content including DOIs before online availability. We promised that we would summarize the results of the survey once we had received and analyzed all the responses.

Support for Crossref implementing the proposed new workflow was overwhelming. Of the 104 responses, 90 were positive, 7 were neutral and 7 were negative. As such we will proceed to make the necessary changes to better support registering content before online availability. We aim to enable this functionality in the second half of 2016.

We received survey responses varying in length from one or two sentences to multiple pages. A lot of the responses also interspersed questions and observations about entirely different issues that were of interest to respondents. As such, it has taken a while for us to analyze the results. We also found it was pretty much impossible for us to tabulate a summary of the responses to the direct questions. Instead we’ll summarize the responses at a high level and then drill down into some of the nuances in the answers and issues that were raised from the responses.

Event Data: open for your interpretation

What happens to a research work outside of the formal literature? That’s what Event Data will aim to answer when the service launches later this year.

Crossref Event Data Logo

Following the successful DOI Event Tracker pilot in Spring 2014, development has been underway to build our new service, newly re-named Crossref Event Data. It’s an open data service that registers online activity (specifically, events) associated with Crossref metadata. Event Data will collect and store a record of any activity surrounding a research work from a defined set of web sources. The data will be made available as part of our metadata search service or via our Metadata API and normalised across a diverse set of sources. Data will be open, audit-able and replicable.

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