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Event Data enters Beta

We’ve been talking about it at events, blogging about it on our site, living it, breathing it, and even sometimes dreaming about it, and now we are delighted to announce that Crossref Event Data has entered Beta. A collaborative initiative by Crossref and DataCite, Event Data offers transparency around the way interactions with scholarly research occur online, allowing you to discover where it’s bookmarked, linked, liked, shared, referenced, commented on etc.

Outreach Day DC. Next Up? You Tell Us

Rallying the community is a key Crossref role. Sometimes this means collaborating on new initiatives but it is also an ongoing process, a cornerstone of our outreach efforts. Part of rallying the community is bringing people together, literally, in a series of outreach days around the globe. It means we encourage dialog with us and among publisher members and non-publisher affiliates. We want to hear from the community and we hope to facilitate conversations in it.

Crossref Event Data: early preview now available

Crossref Event Data logo

Test out the early preview of Event Data while we continue to develop it. Share your thoughts. And be warned: we may break a few eggs from time to time!

Egg

Chicken by anbileru adaleru from the The Noun Project

Want to discover which research works are being shared, liked and commented on? What about the number of times a scholarly item is referenced? Starting today, you can whet your appetite with an early preview of the forthcoming Crossref Event Data service. We invite you to start exploring the activity of DOIs as they permeate and interact with the world after publication.

Event Data: open for your interpretation

What happens to a research work outside of the formal literature? That’s what Event Data will aim to answer when the service launches later this year. Following the successful DOI Event Tracker pilot in Spring 2014, development has been underway to build our new service, newly re-named Crossref Event Data. It’s an open data service that registers online activity (specifically, events) associated with Crossref metadata. Event Data will collect and store a record of any activity surrounding a research work from a defined set of web sources.

Crossref & the Art of Cartography: an Open Map for Scholarly Communications

 

In the 2015 Crossref Annual Meeting, I introduced a metaphor for the work that we do at Crossref. I re-present it here for broader discussion as this narrative continues to play a guiding role in the development of products and services this year.

Metadata enable connections

Cartography BorgesAt Crossref, we make content easy to find, link, cite, and assess through DOIs. Publishers register their publications and deposit metadata through a variety of channels (XML, CSV, PDF, manual entry), which we process and transform into Crossref XML for inclusion into our corpus. This data infrastructure which makes possible scholarly communications without restrictions on publisher, subject area, geography, etc. is far more than a reference list, index or directory.

The logo has landed

Crossref_Logo_Stacked_RGB_SMALLThe rebranding of Crossref was top priority when I joined in May in a new role called “Director of Member & Community Outreach”. Since then I’ve been working to understand the array of services, attributes, and audiences we have developed; to answer the questions “What do we do, for whom, and why?”

As Crossref prepares to celebrate turning fifteen at our annual meeting next week, I am thrilled to present our new brand identity with key messages and logo. And along with “thrilled” you may also detect “nervous excitement”.

Taxonomies Meet-up at #FBM15

The Taxonomies Interest Group would like to invite Crossref members to an informal drop-in at the Frankfurt Book Fair:

4-5pm on Wednesday 14th October at the TEMIS booth H76

DOI Event Tracker (DET): Pilot progresses and is poised for launch

Publishers, researchers, funders, institutions and technology providers are all interested in better understanding how scholarly research is used. Scholarly content has always been discussed by scholars outside the formal literature and by others beyond the academic community. We need a way to monitor and distribute this valuable information.

Linking data and publications

Geoffrey Bilder

Geoffrey Bilder – 2014 September 21

In CollaborationDataCite

Do you want to see if a Crossref DOI (typically assigned to publications) refers to DataCite DOIs (typically assigned to data)? Here you go: http://api.labs.crossref.org/graph/doi/10.4319/lo.1997.42.1.0001 Conversely, do you want to see if a DataCite DOI refers to Crossref DOIs? Voilà: http://api.labs.crossref.org/graph/doi/10.1594/pangaea.185321 Background “How can we effectively integrate data into the scholarly record?” This is the question that has, for the past few years, generated an unprecedented amount of handwringing on the part researchers, librarians, funders and publishers.
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