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Annual Meeting: Join Crossref in Boston this November!

We’d like to invite the scholarly publishing community to get together in Boston this November with the Crossref Annual Meeting as a rally point. This is the event we hold just once a year to get the whole team under one roof, host a lively discussion with the leading voices in scholarly communications, present technical workshops, and offer you the chance to get hands’ on with our latest metadata services. Our free two-day event takes place from November 17-18, 2015 in Boston, MA.

Knols and Citations Part II

Ed Pentz

Ed Pentz – 2008 July 24

In Discussion

Tony’s post highlights Knol’s “service” URIs. Another issue is that many Knol entries have nice long lists of unlinked references. The HTML code behind the references is very sparse. Might the DOI be of use in linking out from these references? I think so. Then, of course, there’s the issue of DOIs for Knols…

The Thing About DOI

thammond

thammond – 2008 June 30

In Discussion

<<<<<<< HEAD

With Library of Congress sometime back (Feb. ’08) announcing LCCN Permalinks and NLM also (Mar. ’08) introducing simplified web links with its PubMed identifier one might be forgiven for wondering what is the essential difference between a DOI name and these (and other) seemingly like-minded identifiers from a purely web point of view. Both these identifiers can be accessed through very simple URL structures:

With Library of Congress sometime back (Feb. ’08) announcing LCCN Permalinks and NLM also (Mar. ’08) introducing simplified web links with its PubMed identifier one might be forgiven for wondering what is the essential difference between a DOI name and these (and other) seemingly like-minded identifiers from a purely web point of view. Both these identifiers can be accessed through very simple URL structures: >>>>>>> origin/master

Exposing Public Data

thammond

thammond – 2008 May 31

In Discussion

As the range of public services (e.g. RSS) offered by publishers has matured this gives rise to the question: How can they expose their public data so that a user may discover them? Especially, with DOI there is now in place a persistence link infrastructure for accessing primary content. How can publishers leverage that infrastructure to advantage? Anyway, I offer this figure as to how I see the current lie of the land as regards DOI services and data.

Referencing OpenURL

thammond

thammond – 2008 May 29

In Discussion

So, why is it just so difficult to reference OpenURL? Apart from the standard itself (hardly intended for human consumption - see abstract page here and PDF and don’t even think to look at those links - they weren’t meant to be cited!), seems that the best reference is to the Wikipedia page. There is the OpenURL Registry page at http://openurl.info/regsitry but this is just a workshop. Not much there beyond the OpenURL registered items.

Chapter 9 - The Closed Book

thammond

thammond – 2007 September 15

In Discussion

Hadn’t really noticed before but was fairly gobsmacked by this notice I just saw on the DOI® Handbook: **Please note that Chapter 9, Operating Procedures is for Registration Agency personnel only.** DOI® Handbook doi:10.1000/182 http://www.doi.org/hb.html And, indeed, the Handbook’s TOC only reconfirms this: 9 Operating procedures* *The RA password is required for viewing Chapter 9. 9.1 Registering a DOI name with associated metadata 9.2 Prefix assignment 9.3 Transferring DOI names from one Registrant to another

CrossTech

thammond

thammond – 2006 October 02

In Discussion

Just a couple comments about CrossTech: 1. Shouldn’t it (or couldn’t it) be linked to from the Crossref home page? (This is a public read list after all and so should be made more widely available.) Maybe at some point could be announced on some lists of interest. 2. Would be very nice to (at least) have a count of membership. I would also like to canvas opinions about making names of the membership public.

PRISM Use Cases

thammond

thammond – 2006 September 25

In Discussion

At last week’s PRISM Face to Face meeting at Time Inc. (NY), Linda Burman raised the question of how (STM) publishers were using PRISM beyond RSS. I gave a brief presentation of how we at Nature were using PRISM: RSS (well you all know about that), Connotea (our social bookmarking tool), SRU (Search/Retrieve by URL), and OTMI (Open Text Mining Interface - which we’ll shortly be making available for wider comment).

Embedding standardized metadata in HTML

Ed Pentz

Ed Pentz – 2006 September 05

In Discussion

On the iSpecies blog Rod Page describes how he extracts DOIs from Google Scholar results - he does use the Crossref OpenURL interface and Connotea to get DOIs too. He also says “DOIs are pretty cool” which is good!

On another blog post to SemAnt Page describes how he uses LSIDs and DOIs for Ant literature.

It seems that there is more and more of this type of use of the DOI so its great we have the OpenURL interface. Could the type of stuff that Page is doing be helped by publishers embedding metadata in their HTML pages? This could include licensing info and information for search engine crawlers.

SEMANTIC WEB: GOOGLE HAS THE ANSWERS, BUT NOT THE QUESTIONS

Ed Pentz

Ed Pentz – 2006 August 22

In Discussion

Posted by special permission from EPS www.epsltd.com.

EPS INSIGHTS :: 01/08/2006

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On the web: http://www.epsltd.com/locate.asp?go=updateNotes

Search the archive: http://www.epsltd.com/locate.asp?go=search

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SEMANTIC WEB: GOOGLE HAS THE ANSWERS, BUT NOT THE QUESTIONS

  • The Google v. Semantic Web discussion at the AAAI (American Association for Artificial Intelligence) featured plenty of confrontation and even some rational argument, but it may chiefly be remembered as the day when Google responded to the challenge of semantic web thinking by saying that the semantic web movement did not matter - thereby demonstrating that it did.

by David Worlock, Chairman