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NLM Blog Citation Guidelines

I’ve just returned from Frankfurt Book fair and noticed that there has been some recent in the The NLM Style Guide for Authors, Editors and Publishers recommendations concerning citing blogs.

Which reminds me of an issue that has periodically been raised here at Crossref- should we be doing something to try and provide a service for reliably citing more ephemeral content such as blogs, wikis, etc.?

Handle Plugin: Some Notes

thammond

thammond – 2007 August 02

In Linking

The first thing to note is that this demo (the Acrobat plugin) is an application. And that comes with its own baggage, i.e. this is a Windows only plugin and is targeted at Acrobat Reader 8. On a wider purview the application merely bridges an identifier embedded in the media file and the handle record filed against that identifier and delivers some relevant functionality. The data (or metadata) declared in the PDF and in the associated handle if rich enough and structured openly can also be used by other applications. I think this is a key point worth bearing in mind, that the demo besides showing off new functionalities is also demonstrating how data (or metadata) can be embedded at the respective endpoints (PDF, handle).

Some initial observations follow below.

OAI-ORE Presentation at OAI5

thammond

thammond – 2007 May 02

In Linking

I posted here about an initial meeting of the OAI-ORE Technical WG back in January. ORE is the “Object Reuse and Exchange” initiative which is aiming to provide a formalism for describing scholarly works as complete units (or packages) of information on the Web using resource maps which would be available from public access points. From a DOI perspective this work is intimately connected with multiple resolution. For further updates on this work, see here for a presentation by Herbert Van de Sompel on OAI-ORE at the OAI5 Workshop (5th Workshop on Innovations in Scholarly Communication) held a couple weeks back at CERN, Geneva, Switzerland.

A Modest Proposal

thammond

thammond – 2007 April 11

In Linking

Was just reminded (thanks, Tim) of the possibility of using a special tag in bookmarking services to tag links to documents of interest to a given community. I think this is a fairly well-established practice. Note that e.g. the OAI-ORE project is using Connotea to bookmark pages of interest and tagging them “oaiore” which can then be easily retrieved using the link http://www.connotea.org/tag/oaiore. I would suggest that Crossref members might like to consider using the tag “crosstech” in bookmarking pages about publishing technology, so that the following links might be used to retrieve documents of interest to this readership:

Markup for DOIs

thammond

thammond – 2007 March 29

In Linking

Following up on his earlier post (which was also blogged to CrossTech here), Leigh Dodds is now Following up on his earlier post (which was also blogged to CrossTech here), Leigh Dodds is now the possibility of using machine-readable auto-discovery type links for DOIs of the form These LINK tags are placed in the document HEAD section and could be used by crawlers and agents to recognize the work represented by the current document.

Indexing URLs

thammond

thammond – 2007 March 08

In Linking

Leigh Dodds proposes in this post some solutions to persistent linking using web crawlers and social bookmarking. “When I use del.icio.us, CiteULike, or Connotea or other social bookmarking service, I end up bookmarking the URL of the site I’m currently using. Its this specific URL that goes into their database and associated with user-assigned tags, etc. … A more generally applicable approach to addressing this issue, one that is not specific to academic publishing, would be to include, in each article page, embedded metadata that indicates the preferred bookmark link.

OpenURL Podcast

thammond

thammond – 2007 February 17

In Linking

Jon Udell interviews Dan Chudnov about OpenURL, see his blog entry: “A conversation with Dan Chudnov about OpenURL, context-sensitive linking, and digital archiving”. The podcast of the interview is available here. Interesting to see these kind of subjects beginning to be covered by a respected technology writer like Jon. As he says in his post: “I have ventured into this confusing landscape because I think that the issues that libraries and academic publishers are wrestling with — persistent long-term storage, permanent URLs, reliable citation indexing and analysis — are ones that will matter to many businesses and individuals.

What’s My Link?

thammond

thammond – 2007 February 05

In Linking

Simon Willison has a great piece here about disambiguating URLs. Best practice on creating and publishing URLs is obviously something of interest to any publisher. See this excerpt from Simon’s post: _“Here’s a random example, plucked from today’s del.icio.us popular. convinceme.net is a new online debating site (tag clouds, gradient fills, rounded corners). It’s listed in del.icio.us a total of four times! http://www.convinceme.net/ has 36 saves http://www.convinceme.net/index.php has 148 saves
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