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The Name’s The Thing

thammond

thammond – 2007 September 20

In Xmp

I’m always curious about names and where they come from and what they mean. Hence, my interest was aroused with the constant references to “XAP” in XMP. As the XMP Specifcation (Sept. 2005) says:

“NOTE: The string “XAP” or “xap” appears in some namespaces, keywords, and related names in this document and in stored XMP data. It reflects an early internal code name for XMP; the names have been preserved for compatibility purposes.”

Actually, it occurs in most of the core namespaces: XAP, rather than XMP.

(Continues.)

Marking up DOI

thammond

thammond – 2007 September 11

In Xmp

(Update - 2007.09.15: Clean forgot to add in the rdf: namespace to the examples for xmp:Identifier in this post. I’ve now added in that namespace to the markup fragments listed. Also added in a comment here which shows the example in RDF/XML for those who may prefer that over RDF/N3.)

So, as a preliminary to reviewing how a fuller metadata description of a Crossref resource may best be fitted into an XMP packet for embedding into a PDF, let’s just consider how a DOI can be embedded into XMP. And since it’s so much clearer to read let’s just conduct this analysis using RDF/N3. (Life is too short to be spent reading RDF/XML or C++ code. :~)

(And further to Chris Shillum’s comment [(Update - 2007.09.15: Clean forgot to add in the rdf: namespace to the examples for xmp:Identifier in this post. I’ve now added in that namespace to the markup fragments listed. Also added in a comment here which shows the example in RDF/XML for those who may prefer that over RDF/N3.)

So, as a preliminary to reviewing how a fuller metadata description of a Crossref resource may best be fitted into an XMP packet for embedding into a PDF, let’s just consider how a DOI can be embedded into XMP. And since it’s so much clearer to read let’s just conduct this analysis using RDF/N3. (Life is too short to be spent reading RDF/XML or C++ code. :~)

(And further to Chris Shillum’s comment]2 on my earlier post Metadata in PDF: 2. Use Cases where he notes that Elsevier are looking to upgrade their markup of DOI in PDF to use XMP, I’m really hoping that Elsevier may have something to bring to the party and share with us. A consensus rendering of DOI within XMP is going to be of benefit to all.)

(Continues.)

W5M0MpCehiHzreSzNTczkc9d

thammond

thammond – 2007 September 10

In Xmp

What on earth can this string mean: ‘W5M0MpCehiHzreSzNTczkc9d’? This occurs in the XMP packet header:

<?xpacket begin=” id=‘W5M0MpCehiHzreSzNTczkc9d’?>

Well from the XMP Specification (September 2005) which is available here (PDF) there is this text:

“The required id attribute must follow begin. For all packets defined by this version of the syntax, the value of id is the following string: W5M0MpCehiHzreSzNTczkc9d”

(See: 3 XMP Storage Model / XMP Packet Wrapper / Header / Attribute: id)

OK, so it’s no big deal to cut and paste that string, it’s just mighty curious why this cryptic key is needed in an open specification, especially since (contrary to what might be implied by the text) it doesn’t seem to vary with version. (Or hasn’t yet, at any rate - more below.)

XMP - Some Other Gripes

thammond

thammond – 2007 September 10

In Xmp

Following on from the missing XMP Specification version number discussed in the previous post here below are listed some miscellaneous gripes I’ve got with XMP (on what otherwise is a very promising technology). I would be more than happy to be proved wrong on any of these points.

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