ORCID auto-update

An ORCID iD is a unique identifier for an individual. It allows everyone (authors, publishers, funders, and research institutions) to identify the work that you do, and accurately attribute it.

Enter once, when you submit a paper, then watch as your ORCID record is automatically updated as your work is published, registered with Crossref, and enters the global citation network.

Who is it for?

  • Authors: save time on manual data entry and easily keep your ORCiD record up-to-date
  • Publishers: help automate processes for your authors and enhance the discoverability of your content
  • Funders, research administrators, librarians and anyone else interested in tracking research outputs.

How does it work?

How ORCID auto-update works

This service is a classic example of our community infrastructure at work. Registering and sharing metadata and open persistent identifiers—such as ORCID iDs and Digital Object Identifiers— means systems can communicate with each other to save everyone a lot of time and effort. When publishers register their content with Crossref, we encourage the inclusion of ORCID iDs, unique codes that identify the individual(s) who contributed to that publication. When an iD is included in the metadata provided to Crossref along with other information about the work such as title, date, and DOI, we can automatically update the author’s ORCID record on publication (with their permission).

People really seem to like it:

How do I get started?

  • Authors: register for an ORCID iD. Then add it to your resume, any profiles where you communicate your work, and ask that your publisher record your ID when you submit a paper, so you can be sure that as your your work takes on a life of its own, you will always be credited.
  • Publishers: Encourage your authors to sign up and submit their ORCID iD along with their paper submission. Build awareness among editors of the importance of collecting this persistent identifier.

Please contact our support team with any questions.

Last Updated: 2017 September 6 by Ginny Hendricks

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