Member participation

Participation reports give—for the first time—a clear picture for anyone to see the metadata Crossref has. This is data that’s long been available via our Public REST API, now visualized.

It’s an opportunity to evaluate and educate. See for yourself where the gaps are, and what our members could improve upon. Understand best practice through seeing what others are doing, and learn how to level-up.

We’re looking for suggestions and feedback during this beta. How will you apply these reports and what else would be helpful? Let us know. If you still have questions after reading the information below, visit our FAQ page.

How it works

There’s a separate Participation Report for each member. Visit crossref.org/members/prep and start typing in the name of a member. A list of member names will appear for you to select from. Behind the scenes our REST API will pull together a report and output it in a clear, visual way.

The report shows what percentage of content has 10 key metadata elements registered. These key elements add context and richness, and help to open up content to easier discovery and wider and more varied use.

This page describes the what, why, where, and how, for each of the ten current checks:

References

Percentage of content items that include reference lists in their metadata.

Why is this important?

Your references are a big part of the story of your content, highlighting its provenance and where it sits in the scholarly map. References give researchers and other users of Crossref metadata a vital data point through which to find your content, which in turn increases chances of your content being read and used. They also enable you to use our Cited-by service, which means you can query for publications that cite your work, as well as show citation counts and lists on your articles.

Where can I learn more?

How can I improve my percentage?

Whenever you register content with us, make sure you include your references in the submission. If you’re registering journal articles, our new Metadata Manager will soon allow you to register your references at the same time as the rest of your content, even if you don’t know the DOIs for them.

You can also add references to your existing content. You can do this via a metadata re-deposit, but it’s easier to use our resource deposit or our Simple Text Query form.


Open references

Percentage of registered references that are set to be openly available. If you’ve set your references to open, they’re available to all users of all Crossref APIs and services. If not, fewer people can see them.

Why is this important?

All metadata that members register with us is made available through our various metadata search and API services. However, references have historically been treated differently than all other metadata.

In July 2017 the Crossref board voted unanimously to remove the ability for members to make case-by-case opt-out choices for metadata distribution, and the membership agreement was updated accordingly.

Crossref members can choose to set their references to ‘Open’, ‘Limited’, or ‘Closed’, per prefix. New members joining from 2018 default to ‘Open’. Members who joined in 2017 or longer ago have been set to ‘Limited’ unless they’ve informed us otherwise.

If you want to ensure your content is as discoverable as possible and playing a key role in scholarly communications, set your references to Open.

Where can I learn more?

How can I improve my percentage?

Members who joined Crossref from 2018 onwards have their references set to Open by default. If you joined us before then, and haven’t already set your references to Open, simply contact our support team, who can open them for you.


ORCID iDs

Percentage of content containing ORCID iDs. These persistent identifiers enable users to precisely identify a researcher’s work—even when that researcher shares a name with someone else, or if they change their name.

Why is this important?

Researcher names are inherently ambiguous. People share names. People change names. People record names differently in different circumstances.

Governments, funding agencies and institutions are increasingly seeking to account for their research investments. They need to know precisely what research outputs are being produced by the researchers that they fund and/or employ. ORCID iDs allow this reporting to be done automatically and accurately.

For some funders, ORCIDs are critical for their research investment auditing, and they are starting to mandate that researchers get ORCID profiles.

Researchers who do not have ORCIDs included in their Crossref metadata risk not being counted in these audits and reports. This, in turn, will reflect badly on publishers who do not routinely include ORCIDs in their Crossref metadata.

Where can I learn more?

How can I improve my percentage?

Make sure you ask your authors for their ORCID iD through your submission system and include them when you register your content. There’s a specific element in the xml for ORCID iDs if you register via XML. If you use the web deposit form there’s a specific field to fill in.

To add ORCID iDs to existing content you need to do a metadata re-deposit.


Funder Registry IDs

The percentage of registered content that contains the name and Funder Registry ID of at least one of the organizations that funded the research.

Why is this important?

Funding acknowledgements give vital context for users and consumers of your content. Extracting these acknowledgements from your content and adding them to your metadata allows funding organizations to better track the published results of their grants, and allows publishers to analyze the sources of funding for their authors and ensure compliance with funder mandates. And, by using the unique funder IDs from our central Funder Registry, you can help ensure the information is consistent across publishers.

Where can I learn more?

How can I improve my percentage?

Make sure you collect funder names from authors via your submission system, or extract them from acknowledgement sections. Match the names with the corresponding Funder IDs from our Funder Registry and make sure you include them in your future Crossref deposits.

If your funder isn’t yet in the Funder Registry, simply let us know at funder.registry@crossref.org.

To add funder information to existing registrations, you can do a full metadata re-deposit but it’s easier to use our CSV upload method.


Funding award numbers

The percentage of registered content that contains at least one funding award number - a number assigned by the funding organization to identify the specific piece of funding (the award or grant).

Why is this important?

  • Funding organizations are able to better track the published results of their grants.
  • Research institutions are able to track the published outputs of their employees.
  • Publishers are able to analyze the sources of funding for their authors and ensure compliance with funder mandates.
  • Everyone benefits from greater transparency on who funded the research, and what the results of of the funding were.

Where can I learn more?

How can I improve my percentage?

Make sure you collect Grant IDs from authors via your submission system, or extract them from acknowledgement sections. Make sure you include them in your future Crossref deposits and add them to your existing content using our CSV upload.


Crossmark enabled

Percentage of content using the Crossmark service, which gives readers quick and easy access to the current status of an item of content - whether it’s been updated, corrected or retracted.

Why is this important?

Crossmark gives quick and easy access to the current status of an item of content. With one click, you can see if the content has been updated, corrected or retracted and can access extra metadata provided by the publisher. It allows you to reassure readers that you’re keeping content up-to-date, and showcases any additional metadata you want readers to view while reading the content.

Where can I learn more?

How can I improve my percentage?

If you aren’t yet using Crossmark, you can ask us to enable Crossmark for you. Simply contact our membership team.

If you have been enabled, make sure you have a Crossmark policy page on your website. Add the Crossmark button to your html pages and make sure you’re registering the relevant metadata to ‘feed the button’. You can also add Crossmark metadata to existing content using a resource deposit. You can find out more with our Crossmark Getting Started Guide.


Text-mining URLs

The percentage of registered content containing full text URLs in the metadata to help researchers easily locate your content for text and data mining.

Why is this important?

Researchers are increasingly interested in text and data mining published scholarly content - the automatic analysis and extraction of information from large numbers of documents. If you can make it easier for researchers to mine your content, you will massively increase your discoverability.

Text and Data Mining poses technical and logistical problems for scholarly researchers and publishers alike. It is impractical for researchers to negotiate many different websites to locate the full text that they need. And it doesn’t make sense for each publisher to have a different set of instructions about how to best find the full text in the required format. All parties benefit from support of standard APIs and data representations in order to enable text and data mining across both open access and subscription-based publishers.

The Crossref REST API can be used by researchers to locate the full text of content across publisher sites. Publishers register these URLs - often including multiple links for different formats such as PDF or XML - and researchers can request them programatically.

The publisher remains responsible for actually delivering the full text of the content requested. This means that open access publishers can simply deliver the requested content, while subscription publishers use their existing access control systems to ensure that subscribers can reach the full text.

Where can I learn more?

How can I improve my percentage?

Make sure you include full text URLs in your future Crossref deposits and add them to your existing content using a Resource Only Deposit.


License URLs

The percentage of registrations that contain URLs that point to a license that explains the terms and conditions under which readers can access content.

Why is this important?

Researchers are increasingly interested in text and data mining published scholarly content - the automatic analysis and extraction of information from large numbers of documents. If you can make it easier for researchers to text and data mine your content, you will massively increase your discoverability.

This is done by adding the full text URL into your metadata - but that’s of limited value if the researchers can’t determine what they are permitted to do with the full text. This is where the licence URLs come in. Publishers who have proprietary licenses can use the URI to direct users to their terms and conditions. Open access publishers can use this element to record the URLs of well-known open licences like those of the Creative Commons.

Where can I learn more?

How can I improve my percentage?

Make sure you include licence URLs in your future Crossref deposits and add them to your existing content using a Resource Only Deposit or by uploading a .csv file.


Similarity Check URLs

The percentage of content registered that includes Similarity Check URLs, enabling iThenticate to consume the content and you to use the Similarity Check service and efficiently check your content for plagiarism.

Why is this important?

The Similarity Check service helps you to prevent scholarly and professional plagiarism by providing editorial teams with access to Turnitin’s powerful text comparison tool. With a database of over 50 million full-text scholarly content items, the iThenticate tool provides immediate feedback regarding a manuscript’s similarity to other published academic and general web content.

Similarity Check members contribute their own published content into iThenticate’s database of full-text literature via Similarity Check URLs, and this is an obligation of using the service. If members aren’t registering these, they can’t take part in the Similarity Check service.

Where can I learn more?

How can I improve my percentage?

For future content registration, make sure you include these URLs as part of your standard DOI deposit. It needs to be deposited within the “crawler-based” collection property, with item crawler “iParadigms”.

You can add these URLs into your already-deposited DOIs using a resource-only deposit, or by using the Supplemental-Metadata Upload option available with our web deposit form.


Abstracts

Percentage of content that includes the abstract in the metadata, giving further insights into the content of the work.

Why is this important?

The abstract gives even more information to the user about your content, making your items even more discoverable.

Where can I learn more?

How can I improve my percentage?

Make sure you include abstracts when you register your content - it’s available for everything other than dissertations and reports. If you submit via XML the abstract is placed in the “jats:abstract” element and needs to be in JATS format. If you use the web deposit form, there’s a specific field for this.

For existing content, you can add abstracts by running a full full metadata re-deposit.


Please contact Anna Tolwinska in our membership team with any questions.

Last Updated: 2018 October 6 by Amanda Bartell